Posts tagged books

19 Notes

ALL THE FEELS

Late to the game but I (Ana) finally sat down to read my first Dorothy L Sayers book, Strong Poison and it is safe to say that I:

1) LOVE IT

2) Have become obsessed with Lord Peter and Harriet Vane in the best possible way

6 Notes

But in the name of the most holy, Mosca, of all the people you could have taken up with, why Eponymous Clent?’

Because I’d been hoarding words for years, buying them from peddlers and carving them secretly on to bits of bark so I wouldn’t forget them, and then he turned up using words like ‘epiphany’ and ‘amaranth’. Because I heard him talking in the marketplace, laying out sentences like a merchant rolling out rich silks. Because he made words and ideas dance like flames and something that was damp and dying came alive in my mind, the way it hadn’t since they burned my father’s books. Because he walked into Chough with stories from exciting places tangled around him like maypole streamers…

Mosca shrugged.

‘He’s got a way with words.’

Awesome quote is awesome. From Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge

Notes

Middle Grade kids in: BOOKSLOOSE! This is the most awesome thing ever.  (via Bookshelves of Doom)

140 Notes

popculturebrain:

New Hunger Games Clip Featuring Josh Hutcherson and Stanley Tucci

EEEE! Is it March 23 yet?!?! 

10 Notes


Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Leslie. The year she turned eight, two things happened: her mother left Leslie and her father to move to California with a stockbroker; and, in the middle of a sensational murder trial, the fae of story and song admitted to their existence. Leslie never heard from her mother again, but the fairies were another matter.

Have started reading Patricia Briggs’ Fair Game (Alpha & Omega book 3), and it is, predictably, AWESOME. If you haven’t yet, just read the prologue.

Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Leslie. The year she turned eight, two things happened: her mother left Leslie and her father to move to California with a stockbroker; and, in the middle of a sensational murder trial, the fae of story and song admitted to their existence. Leslie never heard from her mother again, but the fairies were another matter.

Have started reading Patricia Briggs’ Fair Game (Alpha & Omega book 3), and it is, predictably, AWESOME. If you haven’t yet, just read the prologue.

3 Notes

There ain’t no such thing as a good mistress, on account of a mistress ain’t a good thing to be. Think on it, Mammy. Old Missy maybe taught you to read and write and speak as white as her own children. But she ain’t set you free.
From The Freedom Maze by Delia Sherman. AMAZING BOOK. You should all read it.  

6 Notes

The icarus paused gracefully at the steps; all his moves were grace. “Do you come?”

Aeriel turned back to him. “I am to be your bride,” she said, not questioning. The certainty of it overwhelmed her.

The darkangel looked at her then and laughed, a long, mocking laugh that sent the gargoyles into a screaming, chattering frenzy. “You?” he cried, and Aeriel’s heart shrank, tightened like a knot beneath the bone of her breast. “You be my bride? By the Fair Witch, no. You’re much too ugly.”

From the awesome 1982 fantasy novel The Darkangel by Meredith Ann Pierce. 

12 Notes

OOOOOOO. Interesting news: J K Rowling to publish book for adults with Little, Brown. From the press release:

Little, Brown has world English rights to the first novel for adults  by JK Rowling, the company announced Thursday morning. Little Brown UK  publisher David Shelley will serve as Rowling’s editor and Michael  Pietsch will oversee publication in the US. All other details—title,  pub date “and further details about the novel will be announced later in  the year.” But one important element has been settled: While the world  waits for Pottermore and the Harry Potter ebooks, Little, Brown promises  they will publish “both in print and ebooks.”
Rowling says in the release: “Although I’ve enjoyed writing it every  bit as much, my next book will be very different to the Harry Potter  series, which has been published so brilliantly by Bloomsbury and my  other publishers around the world. The freedom to explore new territory  is a gift that Harry’s success has brought me, and with that new  territory it seemed a logical progression to have a new publisher.  I am  delighted to have a second publishing home in Little, Brown, and a  publishing team that will be a great partner in this new phase of my  writing life.” Rowling was represented by Neil Blair at The Blair  Partnership.

OOOOOOO. Interesting news: J K Rowling to publish book for adults with Little, Brown. From the press release:

Little, Brown has world English rights to the first novel for adults by JK Rowling, the company announced Thursday morning. Little Brown UK publisher David Shelley will serve as Rowling’s editor and Michael Pietsch will oversee publication in the US. All other details—title, pub date “and further details about the novel will be announced later in the year.” But one important element has been settled: While the world waits for Pottermore and the Harry Potter ebooks, Little, Brown promises they will publish “both in print and ebooks.”

Rowling says in the release: “Although I’ve enjoyed writing it every bit as much, my next book will be very different to the Harry Potter series, which has been published so brilliantly by Bloomsbury and my other publishers around the world. The freedom to explore new territory is a gift that Harry’s success has brought me, and with that new territory it seemed a logical progression to have a new publisher.  I am delighted to have a second publishing home in Little, Brown, and a publishing team that will be a great partner in this new phase of my writing life.” Rowling was represented by Neil Blair at The Blair Partnership.

8 Notes

Ana’s book haul from today’s outing. The one on top was acquired at the Cambridge Book Fair from a very knowledgeable bookseller of rare and old Children’s books. Recommended as a read with a feminist approach and it’s from 1913.  

Ana’s book haul from today’s outing. The one on top was acquired at the Cambridge Book Fair from a very knowledgeable bookseller of rare and old Children’s books. Recommended as a read with a feminist approach and it’s from 1913.  

191797 Notes

That moment when you finish a book, look around, and realize that everyone is just carrying on with their lives as though you didn’t just experience emotional trauma at the hands of a paperback.

That’s how Ana felt when she finished reading Code Name Verity