2055 Notes

maggie-stiefvater:

Today I got a message that made me rageful.

It was about a scene in The Dream Thieves. I don’t want to be spoilery, so I will just say it goes like so: Boy wants to kiss Girl. He asks her. Girl says no, even though he asked nicely. She does not want to kiss him, Girl says. He does not kiss her. But he is sad about it.

This message (which also echoes thoughts I’ve seen in the online Raven Cycle readership) wanted to know why Girl was being such a jerk. He asked nicely, said the reader. She could have just given him one, as, like, a send-off. She’d wanted to kiss Boy before, after all.

No.

No, she couldn’t have. She said no. It doesn’t matter if we like Boy as a reader. It doesn’t matter if Girl, in the world of the book, likes him as a friend. It doesn’t matter if Girl at a previous moment considered kissing Boy. If Girl has decided she doesn’t want to kiss Boy, ever

ever

EVER

EVER

Girl never, ever has to kiss Boy.

No matter how nicely he asks.

No matter how sad it makes him.

No matter if she is drunk at a party or he threatened harm to himself or if she didn’t say it loudly or he asks her super, super nicely.

No means no.

And it makes me sad that it’s GirlReaders I see judging GirlCharacter. Yeah, I’m sad he got rejected too. He’s a nice kid. But I would hope readers would do the same thing he did, in the book: respect that her no meant no, and respect that she had the right to say it.

146 Notes

adribbleofink:

scottlynch78:

So, today, 1 April 2014, is book release day for Katherine Addison’s THE GOBLIN EMPEROR, a book I had the pleasure of reading many months ago.
There are two things I ought to tell you about Katherine Addison. The first is that you probably know her better as Sarah Monette, author of MÉLUSINE and its follow-up novels in the DOCTRINE OF LABYRINTHS sequence, as well as a lot of great short fiction and a number of pieces co-authored with my esteemed girlfriend Elizabeth Bear. The second is that she’s a friend of mine, and I admit that I have nothing but warm feelings for her and her work,* and even with that fully and fairly disclosed I am now going to attempt to sell you this book.
Because it’s really fucking good, and it and its author both deserve to shine.
THE GOBLIN EMPEROR scratched an itch I wasn’t even aware I still had before reading it, namely, the pleasure of a story sunk in courtly intrigue, ritual, and etiquette in which a badly overmatched protagonist must match wits against the social machinery of entrenched and dangerous opposition. As an old fan of the Ray Feist / Janny Wurts EMPIRE trilogy (probably the most intricate and clever novels ever written in the Riftwar milieu) I was delighted by the mental fires THE GOBLIN EMPEROR relit for me.
Maia is the fourth and final son of the emperor of the elven court, the product of an ill-advised political marriage to a goblin lady. The emperor has several pure-blooded sons, so the half-goblin Maia is banished to the middle of nowhere in the care of a drunk, indifferent cousin. In his late teens, he is just becoming used to life as an inconvenient historical footnote when imperial messengers bring the news that the emperor’s airship has gone down, taking with it the emperor and all his favored heirs.
Along with the crown, Maia inherits the disdain of any number of factions at the elven court, most of which are already moving confidently against him while investigators are still sifting pieces of his father from the airship wreckage.
THE GOBLIN EMPEROR, however, is so much more than a clever tale of wits and manners and letters flung like catapult stones. It’s an exploration of the ironic powerlessness of power; how Maia, who can order life or death on a whim for anyone in what is now his empire, will never again have the freedom to sleep alone, to dismiss his bodyguards, to show friendly informality in public, or to do so much as dress himself. Though he can start wars, bring down mountains, and bridge rivers, Maia must navigate the rules and traditions of his court like an invisible labyrinth, facing prejudice and treason even from those sworn to serve him most closely.
In this respect, it’s much of a piece with another fascinating book I read years ago, Vonda N. McIntyre’s THE MOON AND THE SUN (winner of the Nebula Award). The protagonist of that novel, Marie-Josèphe, is a lady-in-waiting at the court of Louis XIV who resolves to rescue a genuine mermaid being callously exhibited in a fountain at the royal court. What makes Marie-Josèphe so fascinating is her absolute lack of formal power. As a woman in 17th-century France, she’s one notch above property and her life is entirely in the keeping of her brother, who can banish her to a nunnery and seems to be waiting for an excuse to do so. Marie-Josèphe has genuine gifts for science and music, yet is incapable of using them to reason with the men around her, who rebuke her for any public display of simple competence. And yet she fights… an important thing to note, oh writers, that power and agency are two very, very distinct things.
Maia, the titular GOBLIN EMPEROR, leads an infinitely cushier life yet is just as separated from the heroic fantasy tradition of kicking ass to solve his problems. In fact, Maia doesn’t kick a single ass in this novel. Maia cannot, under any circumstances, raise so much as a fist to strike someone in his court. He has people who tell people to tell other people to do that for him. Maia has no magic, no sorcerous weapons, no secret fate, no intervening gods. He has no lightning-bolt scar on his forehead. His power is the power of whispers and letters, of appointments and offices, of ritual and ceremony. Death is the only prize for coming in second in this etiquette contest.
If you’re at all interested in any of this, if you’re at all inclined to see this book succeed (and to see an excellent writer get a second shake in the commercial arena after several painful years of health issues), then please, heed my shameless begging and buy a copy soon. Soon! The first week of a new book’s release is the most important week. It ain’t fair, but it is what it is.
An exploration of privilege and constraint, a story of outsiders breaking in, an unapologetic love-letter to baroque and beautiful linguistic customs, and a story of compassion finding its way through cracks in the walls of despotism and greed, THE GOBLIN EMPEROR is worth the turn of every last page.
——-
*In fact you might note that a blurb from yours truly adorns the cover of this novel. This is a delightful first for me.

#want

adribbleofink:

scottlynch78:

So, today, 1 April 2014, is book release day for Katherine Addison’s THE GOBLIN EMPEROR, a book I had the pleasure of reading many months ago.

There are two things I ought to tell you about Katherine Addison. The first is that you probably know her better as Sarah Monette, author of MÉLUSINE and its follow-up novels in the DOCTRINE OF LABYRINTHS sequence, as well as a lot of great short fiction and a number of pieces co-authored with my esteemed girlfriend Elizabeth Bear. The second is that she’s a friend of mine, and I admit that I have nothing but warm feelings for her and her work,* and even with that fully and fairly disclosed I am now going to attempt to sell you this book.

Because it’s really fucking good, and it and its author both deserve to shine.

THE GOBLIN EMPEROR scratched an itch I wasn’t even aware I still had before reading it, namely, the pleasure of a story sunk in courtly intrigue, ritual, and etiquette in which a badly overmatched protagonist must match wits against the social machinery of entrenched and dangerous opposition. As an old fan of the Ray Feist / Janny Wurts EMPIRE trilogy (probably the most intricate and clever novels ever written in the Riftwar milieu) I was delighted by the mental fires THE GOBLIN EMPEROR relit for me.

Maia is the fourth and final son of the emperor of the elven court, the product of an ill-advised political marriage to a goblin lady. The emperor has several pure-blooded sons, so the half-goblin Maia is banished to the middle of nowhere in the care of a drunk, indifferent cousin. In his late teens, he is just becoming used to life as an inconvenient historical footnote when imperial messengers bring the news that the emperor’s airship has gone down, taking with it the emperor and all his favored heirs.

Along with the crown, Maia inherits the disdain of any number of factions at the elven court, most of which are already moving confidently against him while investigators are still sifting pieces of his father from the airship wreckage.

THE GOBLIN EMPEROR, however, is so much more than a clever tale of wits and manners and letters flung like catapult stones. It’s an exploration of the ironic powerlessness of power; how Maia, who can order life or death on a whim for anyone in what is now his empire, will never again have the freedom to sleep alone, to dismiss his bodyguards, to show friendly informality in public, or to do so much as dress himself. Though he can start wars, bring down mountains, and bridge rivers, Maia must navigate the rules and traditions of his court like an invisible labyrinth, facing prejudice and treason even from those sworn to serve him most closely.

In this respect, it’s much of a piece with another fascinating book I read years ago, Vonda N. McIntyre’s THE MOON AND THE SUN (winner of the Nebula Award). The protagonist of that novel, Marie-Josèphe, is a lady-in-waiting at the court of Louis XIV who resolves to rescue a genuine mermaid being callously exhibited in a fountain at the royal court. What makes Marie-Josèphe so fascinating is her absolute lack of formal power. As a woman in 17th-century France, she’s one notch above property and her life is entirely in the keeping of her brother, who can banish her to a nunnery and seems to be waiting for an excuse to do so. Marie-Josèphe has genuine gifts for science and music, yet is incapable of using them to reason with the men around her, who rebuke her for any public display of simple competence. And yet she fights… an important thing to note, oh writers, that power and agency are two very, very distinct things.

Maia, the titular GOBLIN EMPEROR, leads an infinitely cushier life yet is just as separated from the heroic fantasy tradition of kicking ass to solve his problems. In fact, Maia doesn’t kick a single ass in this novel. Maia cannot, under any circumstances, raise so much as a fist to strike someone in his court. He has people who tell people to tell other people to do that for him. Maia has no magic, no sorcerous weapons, no secret fate, no intervening gods. He has no lightning-bolt scar on his forehead. His power is the power of whispers and letters, of appointments and offices, of ritual and ceremony. Death is the only prize for coming in second in this etiquette contest.

If you’re at all interested in any of this, if you’re at all inclined to see this book succeed (and to see an excellent writer get a second shake in the commercial arena after several painful years of health issues), then please, heed my shameless begging and buy a copy soon. Soon! The first week of a new book’s release is the most important week. It ain’t fair, but it is what it is.

An exploration of privilege and constraint, a story of outsiders breaking in, an unapologetic love-letter to baroque and beautiful linguistic customs, and a story of compassion finding its way through cracks in the walls of despotism and greed, THE GOBLIN EMPEROR is worth the turn of every last page.

——-

*In fact you might note that a blurb from yours truly adorns the cover of this novel. This is a delightful first for me.

#want

3 Notes

Very fancy package for a sample of #RuinandRising by Leigh Bardugo

Very fancy package for a sample of #RuinandRising by Leigh Bardugo

61 Notes

2865 Notes

The Walking Dead: The Grove

180 Notes


"Don’t worry, he’s going to come back. I didn’t hurt his brains."
The Walking Dead, Issue 61


GUH. Just caught up on last night’s episode and this panel.

"Don’t worry, he’s going to come back. I didn’t hurt his brains."

The Walking Dead, Issue 61

GUH. Just caught up on last night’s episode and this panel.

94 Notes

Power, Consent, and Speaking Up.

catagator:

Two must-read posts this morning concerning allegations of sexual misconduct in the YouTube community, surrounding DFTBA Records:

  • This is very upsetting by Carrie Mesrobian. I find #2, #4, and #7 to be incredibly important points in this post.
  • Power, policy, and ages by Elizabeth Burns. She ties what’s happened here back to libraries and working with teens and how slippery a slope that can potentially be.

I have little to add to this important conversation except to say I was unimpressed with Hank’s video for all of the reasons Carrie lists. While the point of the video was not about privilege, Hank admits to his own privilege at the end, suggesting that with the platform and power he holds, there’s much to be done in terms of developing partnerships and continuing a conversation about consent. 

What’s fascinating to me is how quiet all of this has really been. Little talk has expanded beyond the YouTube community. Why aren’t we talking about this on a wider scale? Why aren’t we especially talking about the part where a 14-year-old girl is being called a “young woman?” That means she is being called a woman, and by its usage it lessens the responsibility for the adult man in the relationship because woman and man are equals in a way “teenager” and “adult man” are not?

While I commend Maureen Johnson for speaking up about her own experiences, there is something missing. I can’t put my hands on exactly what. 

Or maybe I can, and maybe it’s this: as much as we can talk about own own experiences as victims of a system that calls 14-year-olds “young women” and expects that of them while forgiving 20-something-year-old-men for their gross behavior (whether in this particular situation or any other), what we need to do is what Carrie is doing.

We need to call other people out. 

We need to not just share stories of being victims, but we need to step up and say that we are victims BECAUSE of what someone else has done. BECAUSE of how other people frame things. 

It is a hard and a brave thing to stand up and call out names where there are names to be called out. But you only ever change things when you step up and do that very thing. 

So yes, share stories of when bad things happened to you if you’re comfortable doing that. The more voices that are out there, the better and more clear it becomes this isn’t a one-time, one-instance thing.

But there has to be more than that. 

There has to be sustained dialog.

And sometimes you have to be willing to not be “awesome” and call out the problems by their very name. It’s also necessary to step beyond acknowledging your privilege and actually use that power to help lift other people up, rather than shove things into a box and hope the lid won’t be opened. 

I shared a quote from this post this weekend and I’m still thinking about it in relation to everything going on. Reiterating it: you don’t get a cookie for doing the right thing

133858 Notes

captain-boomerang:

captain-boomerang:

check out this periodic table

image

I have made a lot of bad jokes but this is still probably my greatest hit

37 Notes

Announcing our new Tumblr project!

ladybusinessplus:

The Friendship Zone is a new tumblr where the three female friends behind Lady Business post gifs, pictures, quotes, essays and links that prove that women like other women. We aim to challenge the widespread belief that women are all engaged in a perpetual cat fight by creating a space that gathers and shares a lot of instances that disprove it. We include both real and fictional examples of friendship, admiration and support between women; through these we hope to provide a reminder that there’s a ton of support for women out there and to push back against harmful narratives about how women interact. 

Come hang out with us there :D

Excited!

47 Notes

summerscourtney:

Links:
About ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS
About Sarah McCarry
What is a headcrab
What is a Courtney Summers

Because this is great. Because Courtney Summers is great. Because All Our Pretty Songs is even greater.